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US section - 6k gif





"And on top of all this the car I drove could not find [BBC]Radio 2. It just locked on to [BBC]Radio 1, which completed my discomfort as surely as if Id slammed my head in the door."
Jeremy Clarkson, "And Another Thing"



Live US Radio on the Internet - The most accurate source of links to over 2000 US radio stations broadcasting LIVE and NOW, on the Internet

Due to royalties/copyright issues, you will find that you cannot listen to some US radio stations if you are outside the USA - this includes ALL CBS owned and operated radio stations. This is a financial decision by the relevant station or its owners.

Click here for information on how you can listen from outside the USA.


The US radio scene is different from that in most other parts of the world. One of the main differences is the naming of the stations. US radio stations use "call-letters" (in a similar way to Canadian radio stations) instead of names. These call-letters usually comprise 3 or 4 letters, such as "WJR" or "KVST". Generally speaking (with a few exceptions) those stations with call-letters beginning with "W" are located East of the Mississippi River, whilst those beginning with "K" are West of it. Many stations add their own name which  (usually, but not always)  ties in with their call-letters. For example, KDGE also calls itself "The Edge", WFXF "The Fox" and so on. KISS FM is a very popular name which sometimes, considering the station call letters, is bewildering!

There is also a tendency for AM stations to drop the last "0" of their frequency - US stations use 10kHz channel spacing on AM and therefore their frequency will always end in "0". For example WABC 770kHz calls itself "77 WABC".



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